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Jenna Weissman Joselit’s great review in The Forward please click to read!

"THE FORWARD", REINVENTING JUDAICA

Amy Reichert: Reinventing Judaica at Spertus!

October 5, 2014 to March 8, 2015, First floor gallery.

Admission is free. Gallery Talks Join us for a drop-in gallery talk. Meet Amy Reichert and learn about her creative process. Sunday, October 19 at 1 pm  Thursday, December 11 at 1 pm Sunday, March 8 at 1 pm These programs are free. No reservations required. See this link: http://www.spertus.edu/exhibits/amy-reichert

Spertus Institute for Jewish Learning and Leadership is pleased to present this debut exhibit of work by local architect and designer Amy Reichert. Amy Reichert has been creating Jewish ritual objects (or Judaica) since 1995 when she was inspired to create a Passover seder plate for a competition funded by Philip and Sylvia Spertus (the son and daughter-in-law of Herman Spertus, one of the brothers for whom Spertus Institute is named). Ms. Reichert’s creative process fuses sophisticated interpretation of Jewish texts with innovative contemporary design to express the essence of objects used for celebrations and ceremonies. Ms. Reichert received her BA and MArch from Yale University. She combines her studio work with teaching at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

ArtWorld Chicago and American Craft Council feature Spertus exhibition

http://artworldchicago.com/2014/09/30/amy-reichert-reinventing-judaica/ http://craftcouncil.org/event/amy-reichert-reinvented-judaica

Featured in Chicago Home and Garden’s Domestica Blog!

See this link:  http://www.chicagohomemag.com/Chicago-Home/Domestica/March-2013/Set-Your-Passover-Table-with-a-Modern-Seder-Plate/ Gina Bazer loves Seder Plate II:  “But, if I were to have the Grace restaurant equivalent of a Passover seder at my house, I would consider this sculptural plate (shown at right) by local artist Amy Reichert. Made of Jerusalem Gold limestone and hand-hammered brass, it is $3,600 and available here.”

Judaism & the Arts: CCAR Journal, Winter 2013

“Mishkan and Sukkah” article by Amy Reichert Special issue of the CCAR Journal: The Reform Jewish Quarterly on Judaism and the Arts, edited by Eve Ben-Ora and Vicki Reikes Fox. Includes essays on the role of design, painting, architecture, poetry, and other artistic practices in contemporary Jewish life. More info at: CCARNET.org.

500 Judaica

Four pieces of Amy’s work were selected for 500 Judaica: Innovative Contemporary Ritual Art– a recent addition to Lark Publishers’ ”500” series of coffee-table books exploring contemporary design. “These outstanding Jewish ceremonial and ritual objects make a beautiful new addition to the celebrated 500 series. Contemporary in style and lovingly handcrafted, they come from North America, Europe, and Israel, and demonstrate the diversity of Judaism. The artworks include tzedakah boxes, shofars, tallits, Shabbat candlesticks, havdalah sets, Kiddush cups, Torah pointers, kippahs, Seder plates, and dreidels.” Works were chosen by juror Daniel Belasco, the Henry J. Leir Assistant Curator at The Jewish Museum in New York. More info at: Lark Crafts.

City of Promises

Winner of the 2012 National Jewish Book Award, presented by the National Jewish Book Council

Amy’s Miriam’s Cup I is featured in this new book exploring the history of New York Jews. City of Promises: A History of the Jews of New York, a three volume set of original research, pioneers a path-breaking interpretation of a Jewish urban community at once the largest in Jewish history and most important in the modern world.
  
Each volume includes a “visual essay” by art historian Diana Linden interpreting aspects of life for New York’s Jews from their arrival until today. These illustrated sections, many in color, illuminate Jewish material culture and feature reproductions of early colonial portraits, art, architecture, as well as everyday culture and community.
 
Overseen by noted scholar Deborah Dash Moore, City of Promises offers the largest Jewish city in the world, in the United States, and in Jewish history its first comprehensive account. More info at: NYU Press.